Yoga


Relax, stretch & unwind with Infinite Harmony Yoga.

We run yoga classes in Lychpit Community Hall, St Mary's Church Parish room in Old Basing and Loddon Vale Indoor Bowls Club in Basingstoke.

Before you attend your first class please ensure that you have completed the Infinite Harmony questionnaire which you can download here. To make sure you get the most from your session please read the following tips and hints.

 

Gentle Chair Yoga

Loddon Vale Indoor Bowls Club, Tuesday's 09.30-10.30

If you are new to yoga or have mobility/injury concerns then this is the class for you. Using chairs and props you will be encouraged to work at your own pace with my guidance.   Please book your place by emailing Vicky.

Relax Yoga

St Mary's Church Parish Room on Tuesdays 19.15 - 20.15

This class is for all levels of ability and uses Asana (postures) to help you relax and deepen your yoga practice. Please note that on the first Tuesday of each month the class will be held at 6.15pm. The class will be held at 7.15pm on subsequent Tuesdays.

Sunday Morning Yoga

Lychpit Community Hall on Sundays 9.15-10.15

This class focuses on strength and flexibility and uses Sun Salutations and strength based postures to deepen your practice and core.

Sunday Night Satsang

Lychpit Community Hall on Selected Sundays 18.30-19.30

This is a deep relaxation yoga class. You will be led through a series of gentle yoga postures before coming down to the floor into supported relaxation postures combined with guided meditation. Pure Sunday night chill out!

Private Tuition

Private lessons available on a 1:1 and up to 1:4 basis. These sessions can be held in your home or other place of your choosing.

1: 1 Initial consultation £55

1:1 hour session - £40

Please ask for rates for more than one person in a private class.

To book a private lesson please contact me on 01256 910108 or email vicky@infiniteharmony.co.uk

Hatha Yoga

There are many types of yoga but the form I teach is traditional Hatha. Hatha means 'the power of the will over the body.'  My teacher, Jenny Beeken, was taught by Sri B. K. S. Iyengar in India and is the founder/principle of the Inner Yoga Trust.

Benefits of Hatha Yoga

There are many physical benefits of hatha yoga, it improves flexibility and muscle joint mobility; strengthens, tones, and builds muscles; corrects posture; strengthens the spine; eases back pain; improves muscular-skeletal conditions such as bad knees, tight shoulders and neck, swayback and scoliosis; increases stamina; creates balance and grace; stimulates the glands of the endocrine system; improves digestion and elimination; increases circulation; improves heart conditions; improves breathing disorders; boosts immune response; decreases cholesterol and blood sugar levels; and encourages weight loss.

The mental benefits include: it increases body awareness; relieves chronic stress patterns in the body; refreshes the body by relieving muscle strain; relaxes the mind and body; centers attention; sharpens concentration; and frees the spirit.

Everyone can benefit from following a regular yoga routine, as it counteracts many of the problems suffered in modern life. Asanas release the physical tensions caused by hours of sitting, deep breathing gives vitality by increasing the supply of oxygen to the brain and meditation enhances the powers of concentration. Yoga improves strength and flexibility in the mind as well as the body, and aids relaxation. Yoga can enable one to relax fully, and promotes sound sleep; it also improves digestion and stimulates circulation. It frees the practitioner both physically and mentally, often heightening intuition and creativity.

A guide to the most common yoga styles

Iyengar and ashtanga yoga come from the same lineage – the teachers who developed these styles (BKS Iyengar and the late Pattabhi Jois) were both taught by Tirumalai Krishnamacharya. Many of the asanas (postures) are the same, but the approach is different. Iyengar yoga is great for learning the subtleties of correct alignment. Props – belts, blocks and pillow-like bolsters – help beginners get into poses with correct alignment, even when they're new to them, injured or simply stiff. Anusara yoga is a more modern form of Iyengar.

Ashtanga yoga

Ashtanga is a more vigorous style of yoga. It offers a series of poses, each held for only five breaths and punctuated by a half sun salutation to keep up the pace. You can either attend a regular class or the more traditional Mysore style (see below).

Mysore style

Ashtanga yoga taught one-to-one in a group setting. Students turn up at any time within a three-hour window to do their own practice as taught by their teacher. This is my preferred style of learning yoga and, I think, the safest and most traditional. You go at your own pace, on your own breath.

Vinyasa flow

Teachers lead classes that flow from one pose to the next without stopping to talk about the finer points of each pose. That way, students come away with a good workout as well as a yoga experience. If you're new to yoga, it is a good idea to take a few classes in a slower style of yoga first to get a feel for the poses. Vinyasa flow is really an umbrella term for many other styles. Some studios call it flow yoga, flow-style yoga, dynamic yoga or vinyasa flow. It is influenced by ashtanga yoga.

Bikram yoga

Bikram yoga is the favourite of anyone who loves to sweat. It was created by Indian yogi Bikram Choudhury in the early 1970s. He designed a sequence of 26 yoga poses to stretch and strengthen the muscles as well as compress and "rinse" the organs of the body. The poses are done in a heated room to facilitate the release of toxins. Every bikram class you go to, anywhere in the world, follows the same sequence of 26 poses.

Kundalini yoga

Kundalini yoga was designed to awaken energy in the spine. Kundalini yoga classes include meditation, breathing techniques such as alternate nostril breathing, and chanting, as well as yoga postures.

Hatha yoga

Hatha yoga really just means the physical practice of yoga (asanas as opposed to, say, chanting). Hatha yoga now commonly refers to a class that is not so flowing and bypasses the various traditions of yoga to focus on the asanas that are common to all. It is often a gentle yoga class.

Yin yoga

Yin yoga comes from the Taoist tradition and focuses on passive, seated postures that target the connective tissues in the hips, pelvis and lower spine. Poses are held for anywhere between one and 10 minutes. The aim is to increase flexibility and encourage a feeling of release and letting go. It is a wonderful way to learn the basics of meditation and stilling the mind. As such, it is ideal for athletic types who need to release tension in overworked joints, and it is also good for those who need to relax.

Restorative yoga

Restorative yoga is all about healing the mind and body through simple poses often held for as long as 20 minutes, with the help of props such as bolsters, pillows and straps. It is similar to yin yoga, but with less emphasis on flexibility and more on relaxing.

Jivamukti yoga

Founded in 1984 by David Life and Sharon Gannon, Jivamukti means "liberation while living". This is a vinyasa-style practice with themed classes, often including chanting, music and scripture readings. Jivamukti teachers encourage students to apply yogic philosophy to their daily life

Geraldine Beirne